A silvery grey powder.

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The function(s) performed by the food additive when used in cooking.

  • Colour - Adds or restores the colour of a food

Data according to various sources such as fao, fda, codex. Spot a mistake? Tell us!

Country Status Matched Term
United States
Matching Terms Not Found
European Union
Approved Aluminium
Australia and New Zealand
Approved Aluminium
Philippines
Not Permitted
Japan
Unknown None
Austria
Approved Aluminium
Belgium
Approved Aluminium
Bulgaria
Approved Aluminium
Cyprus
Approved Aluminium
Czech Republic
Approved Aluminium
Denmark
Approved Aluminium
Estonia
Approved Aluminium
Finland
Approved Aluminium
France
Approved Aluminium
Germany
Approved Aluminium
Greece
Approved Aluminium
Hungary
Approved Aluminium
Ireland
Approved Aluminium
Italy
Approved Aluminium
Latvia
Approved Aluminium
Lithuania
Approved Aluminium
Luxembourg
Approved Aluminium
Malta
Approved Aluminium
Netherlands
Approved Aluminium
Poland
Approved Aluminium
Portugal
Approved Aluminium
Romania
Approved Aluminium
Slovakia
Approved Aluminium
Slovenia
Approved Aluminium
Spain
Approved Aluminium
Sweden
Approved Aluminium
United Kingdom
Approved Aluminium
Australia
Approved Aluminium
New Zealand
Approved Aluminium

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Aggravates food intolerances - yes

E173 - Aluminium: New to standards, previously not permitted in Australia. Banned in other countries.

Additive Alert

Derived from minerals - yes

E173 - Aluminium: Aluminium is a naturally occurring element, present in a normal healthy diet. It is used in food as a metallic surface coating. There is evidence that aluminium accumulation in body cells could be toxic and linked to Parkinson-type diseases, or that skeletal deformations could occur. Pure aluminium is a silvery-white metal that is capable of taking a high polish, has high thermal and electrical conductivity, has excellent corrosion resistance, is non-magnetic, malleable and ductile. It is the most commonly occurring metal in the earth's crust (8.3% by weight), and as well as being used in the food industry, is also used in the construction and aerospace industries, in aerosol cans and foil. Production of Al metal involves the following: (i) extraction, purification and dehydration of bauxite; (ii) the electrolysis of Al2O3 dissolved in molten cryolite. Typical products include sugar coated flour confectionery, silver coated tablets. Not currently listed for use in Australia. Avoid it. Suspect of being a neurotoxic hazard and been linked to osteoporosis.

MBM Foods

Banned in some countries - yes

E173 - Aluminium: Avoid it, banned in some countries.

UK Food Guide

Recommended for consumption by children - no

E173 - Aluminium: Hampshire County Council Catering Services (HC3S) recognises that additives in food may cause reactions in certain cases and therefore worked with the Hyperactive Children's Support Group.

UK Food Guide

Linked to cancer - yes

E173 - Aluminium: Has been linked to cancer.

Traditional Oven - Dangerous Food Additives

CI Pigment Metal
Aluminum
Aluminum dust
Aluminum powder
Aluminum pyro powders
c.i. 77000

Collection of sources used to create this food additive summary.

Source
Codex Alimentarius
Food Standards Australia New Zealand
UK Food Guide
UK Food Standards Agency
U.S. Food and Drug Administration
Wikipedia

Lists the U.S. CAS (Chemical Abstracts Service) registry number and EINECS (European INventory of Existing Commercial chemical Substances) numbers when known.

  • CAS Number: 7429-90-5
  • EINECS Number: 231-072-3

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