The amount of silver in the coating of dragée or as in cookie decoration is minuscule.

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The function(s) performed by the food additive when used in cooking.

  • Colour - Adds or restores the colour of a food

Data according to various sources such as fao, fda, codex. Spot a mistake? Tell us!

Country Status Matched Term
United States
Approved Silver
European Union
Approved Silver
Australia and New Zealand
Approved Silver
Philippines
Not Permitted
Japan
Unknown None
Austria
Approved Silver
Belgium
Approved Silver
Bulgaria
Approved Silver
Cyprus
Approved Silver
Czech Republic
Approved Silver
Denmark
Approved Silver
Estonia
Approved Silver
Finland
Approved Silver
France
Approved Silver
Germany
Approved Silver
Greece
Approved Silver
Hungary
Approved Silver
Ireland
Approved Silver
Italy
Approved Silver
Latvia
Approved Silver
Lithuania
Approved Silver
Luxembourg
Approved Silver
Malta
Approved Silver
Netherlands
Approved Silver
Poland
Approved Silver
Portugal
Approved Silver
Romania
Approved Silver
Slovakia
Approved Silver
Slovenia
Approved Silver
Spain
Approved Silver
Sweden
Approved Silver
United Kingdom
Approved Silver
Australia
Approved Silver
New Zealand
Approved Silver

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Banned in some countries - yes

E174 - Silver: New to standards, previously not permitted in Australia. Banned in other countries.

Additive Alert

Derived from minerals - yes

E174 - Silver: It is a metal.

Muslim Consumer Group

Derived from minerals - yes

E174 - Silver: Silver is used in food to give a metallic surface colour. However prolonged consumption may lead to argyria, a blue-grey skin. The greatest source of silver now is as a by product in the manufacture of non-ferrous metals such as Cu, Pb, Zn. Silver is usually obtained from crushed silver bearing ore. The actual method of recovery from the ore depends on which metal is predominant in the ore but normally ends by electrolysis using one of two techniques, either the Moebius or Thum Balbach systems. Silver is used extensively in the photographic industry, as well as in silverware and jewellery, electrically, for silvering mirrors and in batteries. Typical products include sugar coated flour confectionery. Not permitted in Australia prior to 1992. Long regular use can lead to blue-grey skin (this is not dangerous). Avoid it.

MBM Foods

Collection of sources used to create this food additive summary.

Source
Codex Alimentarius
Food Standards Australia New Zealand
UK Food Standards Agency
U.S. Food and Drug Administration
Wikipedia

Lists the U.S. CAS (Chemical Abstracts Service) registry number and EINECS (European INventory of Existing Commercial chemical Substances) numbers when known.

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